Groups Submit Comments to National Banks Agency Opposing Preemption of States


The OCC's proposed revisions to 12 CFR Parts 7 and 34 of its regulations identify certain types of state laws that would be preempted for non-real estate loans made by national banks.

The scope of the OCC's proposal potentially affects consumer protection and privacy laws of many states. However, we limit our comments to the potential impact on California laws. Particularly troubling is the uncertain implication of the OCC's rulemaking for important identity theft laws that involve access to, and use of, credit reports. Of equal concern is the OCC's proposed regulation to preempt state laws that require national banks to give mandated statements to be included in billing or credit related documents.

JetBlue: Complaint for Violations of CA Business and Professions Code Sections 17200, et seq.


JetBlue Airways Corporation ("JetBlue"), through an agreement with Torch Concepts, acting in its capacity as a subcontractor for SRS Technologies, provided the personal information of over a million passengers, some of whom are located in California, without such passengers' authorization or consent and in violation of JetBlue's stated privacy policy not to share without consent any passenger data with any third parties.

Letter to House of Reps. and Senate to Oppose HR 2622


The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse and the Identity Theft Resource Center urge you to oppose H.R. 2622 as written because it preempts many state consumer protection laws while failing to prevent credit bureau mistakes or stop identity theft.

California Identity Theft Laws


Read about the laws that apply to victims of identity theft in California.

California Do-Not-Call Registry Is Merging with the Federal List


In 2002, the California Legislature mandated that the state's Attorney General (AG) establish a statewide do-not-call list. It was to be operational by April 1, 2003. But in December 2002, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that it would establish a national do-not-call list that would encompass all of the states. Rather than duplicate efforts and confuse consumers, the California AG's office instead joined with the FTC in order to merge the state's efforts with the federal list. The federal list will not be activated until October 2003. Here's how this has all transpired and what it means for you:

Poll: 91% Voter Support For Financial Privacy Initiative


A public opinion poll commissioned by the Consumer Federation of California Education Foundation found overwhelming voter support for a ballot initiative to protect the privacy of consumer financial information. After hearing a battery of arguments against the initiative, voter support stood at 91 per cent. The poll found no significant difference in support by party affiliation or income level.

Promises of Telemarketing Do-Not-Call Lists And What to Do While You Wait


Fed-up with unwanted telemarketing calls, consumers are anxious to add their telephone number to a do-not-call list. Interest has been fueled by recent media reports of a new do-not-call list soon to launched in California. When this happens, California will join about 20 other states that already have do-not-call lists.

In addition, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has adopted rules that will establish a national do-not-call registry, and the FTC may be joined by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in this effort.

Full-Page Ad Distorts Facts about SB 773, California Financial Privacy Bill


The group's name, as well as its web site's address, www.caprivacyprotection.org, bely the Coalition's true colors. It is an industry-backed organization, comprised of the California Chamber of Commerce and the major financial industry trade associations in the state.

The Coalition's newspaper ad contains outright distortions about the provisions of SB 773. Here are some examples.

San Mateo Co. (California) Board of Supervisors Unanimously Adopts Financial Information Privacy Ordinance


Redwood City - The Board of Supervisors unanimously adopted an ordinance today to protect consumers' financial information privacy. With this ordinance, San Mateo County has become the first jurisdiction in California to provide consumers privacy protections in excess of those found in federal law, Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. This ordinance would require financial institutions to ask for and receive consumerís permission before disclosing consumerís confidential information to third parties.

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