How to Use the Chronology of Data Breaches


How to Use the Chronology of Data Breaches

Data Breaches: Why You Should Care and What You Should Do


Have you been hearing the term “data breach” in the news a lot recently? That’s because there has been a string of sensational breaches from corporate giants like Sony, Epsilon, Citigroup, and Lockheed Martin. A data breach is when a company inadvertently leaks your personal information as a result of a hack attack, lost or stolen computers, fraud, insider theft, and more. Privacy Rights Clearinghouse explains how to follow the breaches, why consumers should be concerned and what to do if a data breach happens to you.

500 Million Sensitive Records Breached Since 2005


The most recent total from the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse’s Chronology of Data Breaches shows more than a half billion sensitive records breached since 2005, leaving Americans vulnerable to identity theft. Employees losing laptop computers, hackers downloading credit card numbers and sensitive personal data accidentally exposed online -- the Chronology of Data Breaches shows hundreds of ways that the personal information of consumers is lost, stolen or exposed. The Chronology of Data Breaches, a project of the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse since 2005, lists incidents involving breached consumer information, such as personal medical records, credit card numbers and Social Security numbers.

The most recent total, published August 24, 2010, is a wake-up call to consumers who think identity theft can’t happen to them. The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse estimates that the Chronology shows only a fraction of the total number of data breaches.

Comments to Department of Health and Human Services re Breach Notification for Unsecured Protected Health Information


The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) appreciates this opportunity to comment on the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS or Department) interim final rules regarding breach notification to individuals in the event of unauthorized use and access of protected health information. The rules, issued in coordination with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), are mandated by Section 13402 of the Health Information Technology for Clinical Health (HITECH) A

Is Your Client Prepared To Comply with the Data Security Breach Notification Laws? (Mansfield)


California adopted the first data security breach notification law, codified at Cal. Civ. Code Section 1798.80 et seq., effective July 1, 2003. nearly 40 other states have since adopted similar laws modeled after, but not the same as, the California law. Presently pending in Congress are several bills that would adopt a variant of the California model on a nationwide basis, including the Notification of Risk to Personal Data Act of 2007, S.239 (introduced January 10, 2007).

The VA's Data Breach - Tips for Veterans and Action You Can Take under Federal Law


(May 23, 2006) Sensitive personal information of 26.5 million veterans was stolen recently when the home of a VA employee was robbed. The individual had brought a computer and disk home containing names, Social Security numbers (SSNs), dates of birth, and other information of anyone who served in the military and has been discharged since 1976. The theft apparently occurred May 3, 2006.

Privacy Advocates Call for Tough Regulation of Financial Data and Stronger Identity Theft Protections


The recent security breaches of sensitive customer information held by ChoicePoint and Bank of America have underscored how vulnerable consumers are to threats of identity theft and the need for stronger protections to reduce such fraud. Watchdog groups are calling for new laws that provide proper oversight of businesses that collect and sell sensitive consumer information and tougher safeguards to give consumers the tools they need to stop identity theft before it starts.

The ChoicePoint Data Security Breach (Feb. '05): What It Means for You


Data aggregators compile in-depth dossiers of personal information on almost everyone, even though many have never heard of them, have never had an account with them, nor have given them permission to obtain personal information. Until recently, many Americans had never heard of ChoicePoint, one of the largest data aggregators. But with recent information coming to light that identity thieves opened 50 accounts to access ChoicePoint’s databases of personal information, many people are just realizing that companies like ChoicePoint exist.

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