Identity Theft: Cases from the PRC Log Files


September 1, 1995

Cheryl and her 7-year-old daughter went to the bank to open a checking account for the daughter. The bank told Cheryl her daughter had a bad credit report. Someone had been using the child's Social Security number to open credit accounts.

Identity Theft: It Can Happen To You, But What's The Point of Reporting It? (Gladstone)


Crooks broke into our joint checking account and robbed us of approximately $1,500 last November. According to officials at the bank where we have our account, the debit card numbers on one of our bank cards was skimmed. What happens, they explained, is that thieves capture your information by attaching an electronic storage device to an automated teller machine (ATM) where your card is swiped.

A Cautionary Tale about Debit Cards and Fraud: A Former Debit Card User Tells Her Story


My first experience with "Debit Card Fraud" happened in August 1997. I get paid once a month, so I pay all my bills by the 5th of each month. This month, I had done that and paid out approximately $1,400, leaving me with about $400 for the rest of the month. Well, on August 6, 1997, I received approximately nine envelopes from Southwest Airlines, all addressed to me at my current address (I thought this was very weird because I had not had any type of contact or business with Southwest). I opened each envelope and found an itinerary for several individuals (unknown to me). These itineraries indicated these individuals "flew" all over the country (between 7-30-97 and 8-3-97) and I was billed for it. The total airlines tickets were $1,775; and, of course since my paycheck had just been deposited into my account, these itineraries were "paid."

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