Letter to the FTC on Job Search Industry Privacy Concerns


We are writing to draw your attention to the challenges consumers face as they search for jobs in today's rapidly evolving, information-rich environment. Both online and off, the machinery of the information economy has created a high demand for large compilations of job seekers' names, email addresses, and resumes. Perversely, the demand for job seeker information does not correlate to the availability of jobs nor the demand for workers.

Resume Database Nightmare: Job Seeker Privacy at Risk


According to legal documents, HotResumes.com sold 4,941 resumes and/or email addresses to Biotechcareers.com for .33 cents each. 

In any job search, it is undeniably important to circulate a resume. However, job seekers need to carefully minimize privacy issues related to resumes while still maintaining appropriate exposure to employers.

Documents Reveal Serious Job Seeker Resume Privacy Violations


Submitting a resume on the Internet could result in a privacy nightmare for would-be job seekers. Online resume databases could be using and selling personal information in ways never imagined by applicants, according to Pam Dixon and the San Diego-based Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC).

Big Brother and the Hiring Process (Kelly)


Perhaps, as the unemployment rate continues upward, it might be appropriate to focus on subjects less lofty than the economy or the administration's policy toward it. Let's instead examine job applications and the human-relations people who review them.

Looked for a job lately? If you have, you know that just to apply you must reveal:

Your social security number.

Your complete educational background, regardless of relevance to the position, as well as the location of each school.

Your complete work history, whether relevant to the position or not.

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