Online Personal Health Records: Are They Healthy for Your Privacy?

A personal health record (PHR) is a tool for collecting, tracking, and sharing information about your health.  Because medical records are among the most sensitive type of personal information, we at the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse have some concerns about PHRs. PHRs may not necessarily be private and may not be secure, despite what the hosting site tells you.

A Consumer's Complaint Regarding Rite Aid Pharmacy

I feel that Rite Aid is using my family's private medical information -- our prescription records -- to aggressively market prescription medications on behalf of themselves and pharmaceutical manufacturers. I find this to be an egregious invasion of my privacy and am concerned that Rite Aid may be violating laws in California regarding my medical records privacy. At the very least, I consider this to be unprofessional conduct.

Medical Records Privacy: Fears and Expectations of Patients

The title of this talk is "Medical Records Privacy: Fears and Expectations of Patients". So you can get an understanding of my point of view, I want to start out by talking about our project, the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, and then make several points about the topic.

Comments to California Department of Insurance Concerning Privacy of Personal Financial and Medical Record Information

We are pleased to see that the proposed regulations, as revised, include a number of changes that will benefit individual privacy interests. We commend the staff of the Department for efforts to balance multiple interests and their willingness to consider our concerns about loss of personal privacy.

Comments to Department of Health and Human Services re Breach Notification for Unsecured Protected Health Information

The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) appreciates this opportunity to comment on the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS or Department) interim final rules regarding breach notification to individuals in the event of unauthorized use and access of protected health information. The rules, issued in coordination with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), are mandated by Section 13402 of the Health Information Technology for Clinical Health (HITECH) A

Disclosure Accounting: Comments Submitted to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights

 In adopting the final HIPAA Privacy Rule (Privacy Rule) in 2003, OCR included a section outlining a patient’s right to receive an accounting of protected health information (PHI) disclosures. As adopted, however, the Privacy Rule includes many exceptions to the kinds of data that must be included in an accounting, one of which is that an accounting need not tell patients about disclosures made for treatment, payment, and healthcare operations.

Comments to Health and Human Services: Privacy and Security Rule Modification

The Heath Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 calls for certain changes to previously issued HHS rules regarding privacy of individuals’ medical records (the Privacy Rule), security of electronic health records (Security Rule), and enforcement of the security and privacy provisions (Enforcement Rule). The current rule proposal encompasses the HITECH modifications for all three HIPAA rules.

Caremark Reportedly Shares Confidential Prescription Information to Steer Business to CVS Pharmacies

Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) has persistently challenged the health care industry’s improper use and disclosure of confidential medical information, which in many instances is used to market new or additional medication to patients. PRC has become aware that Caremark, a CVS owned company and one of the country’s largest pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), is improperly sharing prescription information with CVS to steer pharmacy patients to CVS pharmacies.

Comments to California Dept. of Public Health: Medical Information Breach Regulations

Consumers enter a hospital or another care facility in California should not have to worry that their health and financial data might end up on a social networking website, in the tabloids, in a dumpster, or in the hands of an identity thief. Yet, instances of the breach of healthcare data in California continue at an alarming pace.

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