Prevent Identity Theft with Responsible Information-Handling Practices in the Workplace

Experts in identity theft report that an increasing number of cases can be traced back to dishonest employees in the workplace who obtain the sensitive personal information of employees and customers and disclose it to identity thieves. One of the keys to preventing identity theft, therefore, is to safeguard personal information within the workplace, whether it's a business, government agency, or nonprofit. Targets for identity thieves include SSNs, driver's license numbers, financial account numbers, PINs, passcodes, and dates of birth.

Why I stopped shopping at Amazon.com: A reading expert sounds off... (Hochhauser)

I've shopped at Amazon.com for several years. But I decided to quit shopping there because of:

1) Their new privacy notice. The revised notice (not a "policy") states that they gather information about consumers every time they search for a product.  That means to me that they've developed a profile on me based not only on what I buy, but what I'm looking for. I don't want them to know that much about me....

The Privacy Implications of Cloud Computing

When users store their data with programs hosted on someone else's hardware, they lose a degree of control over their sensitive information. The responsibility for protecting that information from hackers and internal data breaches then falls into the hands of the hosting company rather than the individual user. Government investigators trying to subpoena information could approach that company without informing the data's owners. Some companies could even willingly share sensitive data with marketing firms. So there is a privacy risk in putting your data in someone else's hands. Obviously, the safest approach is to maintain your data under your own control.

Comments to the Los Angeles City Council: Public Policy Ramifications of Cloud Computing

I am writing to express concern about the proposal for the City of LA to implement Google Apps for its e-mail and office systems.

I am concerned about the propriety of a government entity using services that are “in the cloud,” so to speak, as repositories for sensitive personal and organizational information.

I question if enough is yet known about the privacy, security and confidentiality of personal information in a cloud environment.

PRC's Privacy Policy

NOTICE: We revised our privacy policy to add more detail, describe our online complaint center, spell out the disclosures that we make with more specificity, provide information about access and correction.  We did not make any changes to our basic policy of respecting the privacy of our users, or to our policy of not giving user data to advertisers.

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