Online Privacy: Using the Internet Safely


Fact Sheet 18Online Privacy:
Using the Internet Safely

This fact sheet explains how your online activities may compromise your privacy and the steps you can take to protect youself. As consumers increasingly go online in so many aspects of their daily lives, the challenge is enjoy the conveniences of online activities while limiting the privacy sacrifices. As the focus of online activity migrates from desktop and laptop computers to smartphones and other mobile devices, the mechanisms for protecting your privacy continue to evolve.

Online Privacy FAQ


Fact Sheet 18aOnline Privacy FAQ

Can employers monitor your email at work?  How can you get your information removed from websites like Zabasearch and PeopleFinders?  What can you do if someone is pretending to be you on social networking sites like Myspace and Match.com? 

This FAQ answers some of the questions we are often asked by individuals who contact us concerning online privacy and safety.  Learn what you can do to protect your personal information when you use the Internet.

Google Posts a Link to Its Privacy Policy from Its Home Page


On July 3, 2008, Google made an important change to its home page. It added a new link from the home page to its privacy center.  With just one seven-letter word, Google resolves the controversy over whether its previous practice ran afoul of California privacy law.

Consumer and Privacy Groups Urge Google to Post a Link to Its Privacy Policy from Its Home Page


A coalition of privacy and consumer organizations from California to Washington, D.C. have urged Google to post a prominent link on its homepage to its privacy policy. In a letter released June 3rd, 2008, the groups say this is required by California law and is the widespread practice of commercial web sites.

Keep Your Internet Searches Private


Internet users were shocked to learn that the search queries of over 600,000 individuals were exposed online by AOL recently. Although the personal names of AOL users had been replaced with numbers, apparently for a research project, reporters and others were able to determine the identities of several people. Ixquick, a search engine based in the Netherlands, promises it will permanently delete all users’ personal search details from its log files.

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