Privacy Tips for Online Job Seekers


Fact Sheet 25Privacy Tips for Online Job Seekers

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Job seekers who use online job search web sites must be careful to avoid a type of job scam in which the applicant is asked to accept payment to his or her own bank account. These are known as payment-forwarding or payment-transfer scams. Payment-transfer scams involve a con artist who pretends to be an employer. The con artist uses a job ad to lure an unsuspecting job seeker, or they may use information from a resume they have found online. Such con artists can be quite convincing, and may even steal company names and corporate logos to convince victims that they are legitimate employers.

Bring Your Own Device . . . at Your Own Risk


Fact Sheet 40Bring Your Own Device . . . at Your Own Risk

1.  What is BYOD?

In the not too distant past, employees had no choice but to work at a company's office or on a company laptop or phone.  As mobile electronic devices (tablets and smartphones, for example) became both more accessible and affordable, this changed.  Now employees can work virtually anywhere and it's becoming more and more common for them to use devices for both personal and work purposes. 

Many individuals own multiple mobile devices.  One person may own a smartphone, tablet, and laptop computer.  An employer may also offer employees one or more company-owned devices. For some, it's both inconvenient and less productive to carry company-issued and personal devices.  Others may prefer a specific technology or brand, or simply be annoyed by having to carry multiple devices.

Are You Considering Using a Personal Mobile Device for Work? Read Our Tips on BYOD!


"Bring your own device," or BYOD, is a popular practice with both employers and employees.  Employees like the convenience.  They don't want to worry about carrying multiple phones or tablets. They like using devices they are comfortable with. And, they can work from anywhere.  Employers like having connected employees, and some believe that BYOD policies save the company money.

The tradeoff for employers is that they lose some control over company data and can face greater legal, business and security risks.  Unfortunately, this may mean employees compromise privacy and control over their own phones and data when they agree to participate in a BYOD program.

Tips for Employees

1.  Read and/or understand the employer's policy before you participate.  BYOD policies will vary depending on who you work for, what kind of data you have access to, what industry you are in, and what your role is.  They may involve formal contracts or informal agreements.   As is often the case, the most important thing to do is understand what you are signing up for!   A BYOD policy can create a win-win situation or a messy dispute.  

If the policy is written, read it thoroughly. If you don't understand it, ask your manager or human resources department to explain what it means. 

View and Share our NEW VIDEO on Jobseeker Rights


We are excited to announce that our video highlighting jobseeker rights and background checks is ready to view and share! 

Watch the video to find out what’s keeping Taylor Thomas from getting hired. Learn your rights about employment background checks, and spread the word! Although Taylor is a fictional character, the situation dramatized on the six-minute video is similar to many complaints we have received from individuals who have contacted our hotline with questions and complaints about background check errors.

This Labor Day, PRC Urges Jobseekers to Know Their Rights


As the nation celebrates the achievements of American workers this Labor Day weekend, it’s hard to ignore the 13.9 million people who remain unemployed. Millions of Americans are searching for work, and have been for months. The weak job market means employers are being flooded with candidates. 

To weed out candidates, employers often turn to background checks.  In a poll conducted by The Society for Human Resource Management, 73% of employersreported conducting criminal background checks on all job candidates. There are many companies specializing in employment screening and each uses its own method to gather background data. Unfortunately, many consumers have contacted us to report that they were the subject of a background check containing inaccurate data.  It’s important for job seekers to be aware of their rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), a law that regulates the consumer reporting industry.

Errors in Employment Background Checks: Harmful Long-Term Consequences for Individuals


It is clear to the PRC that the problems of flawed background checks is not new to the FTC. It is also our belief that this is a critical area of consumer protection that deserves the increased attention of the FTC. Our analysis of FTC data uncovered numerous instances of complaints against the same company for reporting inaccurate data, often concerning criminal activities; failure to follow FCRA requirements for limiting information reported; and difficulty in getting the misinformation corrected.

Specialty Reports: What Have They Got on Me?


Most consumers know of their right to free annual credit reports from the three national credit bureaus (Experian, TransUnion and Equifax). But did you know that the same federal law that lets you see your credit reports entitles you to much more?he Fair Credit Reporting Act gives you the right to free copies of numerous so-called specialty consumer reports. These specialty reports provide information on such matters as your medical conditions, insurance claims, check writing history, rental history, and employment history.

My Space Isn't Your Space: Updating Federal Law to Address Employers' Use of Social Networking Sites for Hiring Decisions (Davis)


 

My Space Isn't Your Space:
Updating Federal Law to Address Employers' Use of
Social Networking Sites for Hiring Decisions
(Davis,16 Kan. J. L. & Pub. Pol'y 237, 2007)

An Increase in Employee Background Checks Strains an Already Weak (Flint)


Two easily identifiable problems with the increased use of background checks are the potential for errors and past mistakes haunting people for far too long.  But, in addition to these problems, there are societal concerns about lack of privacy, ceding judgment to a computer database, and potential over-reliance on a person’s past behavior.

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