Data Breaches: Know Your Rights


In this 4-minute film, Mr. Jackson is alarmed and confused when he receives a letter from his bank notifying him that an employee's laptop was stolen. The laptop contained customer data including his Social Security number and other personally identifiable information. His adult son, Luke, turns to PRC's website to find out what to do. Watch the video to see what happens.

Chronology of Data Breaches


Chronology of Data Breaches

How to Use the Chronology of Data Breaches


How to Use the Chronology of Data Breaches

Coping with Identity Theft: Reducing the Risk of Fraud


Fact Sheet 17Coping with Identity Theft:
Reducing the Risk of Fraud

Identity Theft: What to Do if It Happens to You


Fact Sheet 17aIdentity Theft:
What to Do if It Happens to You

How to Deal with a Security Breach


Fact Sheet 17bHow to Deal with a Security Breach

Have you received a letter or an e-mail informing you that your personal information may have gotten into the wrong hands?   Or perhaps a media report alerted you to a security breach at a company you do business with.

It is increasingly common for companies, educational institutions, and government agencies -- whether or not their state has a breach notice law -- to notify individuals when computer files containing personal information have been hacked, stolen, or lost. If the file includes Social Security numbers, financial account numbers, driver's license numbers -- in short, data that would be useful to identity thieves -- there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of fraud. So, what should you do  if you suspect that your personal information has been compromised? First, don't panic. A security breach does not necessarily mean that you will become a victim of identity theft.

This guide provides instructions on ways to reduce your risk of identity theft. And if the worst happens and you do become a victim of fraud, this guide points you to other sources of information about identity theft.

Frequently Asked Questions about Identity Theft


Fact Sheet 17dFrequently Asked Questions about Identity Theft

Criminal Identity Theft: What to Do if It Happens to You


Fact Sheet 17gCriminal Identity Theft:
What to Do if It Happens to You

Identity Theft Monitoring Services


Fact Sheet 33Identity Theft Monitoring Services

Hardly a day goes by without hearing about someone becoming a victim of identity theft or learning about another data breach. The exposure of Social Security numbers (SSNs) and other personal information can increase consumers’ susceptibility to identity theft. Privacy Rights Clearinghouse’s “Chronology of Data Breaches” documents over 230 million records that have been compromised since January 2005. www.privacyrights.org/ar/ChronDataBreaches.htm

Faced with these alarming statistics, many consumers have turned to identity theft or credit monitoring services for protection. Identity theft monitoring services may sound like a good way to protect your good credit and your good name. However, many of these services are overpriced and are not worth the money that they cost.

Identity Theft Victim: Stop Contact by Collection Agency


Sample letter from a victim of identity theft to a collection agency notifying the agency to cease contact.

        Your Name
        Mailing Address
        Your City, State, Zip

        Date

        Name of Collection Agency
        Mailing Address
        City, State, Zip

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