Don't Become a Target: Make Smart Choices to Protect Your Privacy


With all of the media surrounding the Target, Neiman Marcus, and, now, Michaels data breaches (and potentially other retail outlets), it can be overwhelming to determine what you should do to protect yourself.  Even though you can't prevent a breach, there are steps you can and should take to prevent future headache and harm.   

This is an important alert to read even if you weren't a victim of the recent breaches. As privacy and security professionals say on a regular basis, data breaches aren't a question of "if", they are a question of "when." It is best to be prepared and proactive.

Read more to find out our top 5 tips.

Data Breaches: Our Latest YouTube Video and Tips for Consumers


Since Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) began tracking data breaches in 2005, our records show that more than 563 million records have been reported leaked. This number is significantly lower than the actual figure, however. In many cases, the number of exposed records is either not known or is not reported to the news media or to state and federal reporting authorities.

In most states, businesses are required by law to notify individuals when a data breach compromises personal information that is likely to lead to financial identity theft.  Even when it is not required by law, many companies will notify customers as a courtesy. This means there is a very good chance you will receive a breach notification at some point.

In our latest short film, Data Breaches: Know Your Rights, we explore how a typical consumer may respond to such a notification. The film is the fifth in a six-part YouTube series on important privacy topics.

Spring Cleaning Tips to Keep Personal Data Safe


Planning to spring clean your home or office? One of the biggest parts of spring cleaning is getting rid of clutter you no longer need. In the past, this meant tossing junk like a broken typewriter or planning a garage sale to recoup a few bucks for an old television. But in today's digital age, the adage "when in doubt, toss it out" could actually put you in harm's way. Identity thieves make a career seeking out discarded sensitive documents or digital devices loaded with personal data.

Are the Businesses You Frequent or Work for Exposing You to an Identity Thief?


When we think about data breaches, we often worry about malicious-minded computer hackers exploiting software flaws, or perhaps Internet criminals seeking to enrich themselves at our expense. But the truth is that errors and negligence within the workplace are a significant cause of data breaches that compromise sensitive personal information.

Thus, a critical starting point for preventing future security breaches (and the identity theft that can follow) is developing ironclad policies and practices for handling personal information from within the workplace.

Data Breaches: A Year in Review


2011 was a significant year for data security, with some of the biggest data breaches in our history reported. So far in 2011, we’ve tracked 535 breaches involving 30.4 million sensitive records. This brings the total reported records breached in the U.S. since 2005 to the alarming number of 543 million.

Privacy Rights Clearinghouse has been tracking breaches since 2005 and publishes aChronology of Data Breaches. The Chronology counts the number of records leaked that contain information useful to identity thieves, such as Social Security numbers, financial account numbers, driver's license numbers – and in some states, medical information.

Read our list of the top half dozen most significant data breaches in 2011.

Bogus Group Falsely Claims Signing Ballot Petitions Puts You at Risk for Identity Theft


[California-specific] A new 60-second radio ad airing in southern California is using fear tactics in an attempt to stop voters from signing ballot measure petitions.  The ad purports that giving your name and address to petition campaigners amounts to an “identity theft starter kit.” 

“The threat claimed in these ads is totally false. Social Security numbers are the keys to identity theft.  And obviously those are not collected by petition gatherers,” states Beth Givens, director of Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.

Data Breaches: Why You Should Care and What You Should Do


Have you been hearing the term “data breach” in the news a lot recently? That’s because there has been a string of sensational breaches from corporate giants like Sony, Epsilon, Citigroup, and Lockheed Martin. A data breach is when a company inadvertently leaks your personal information as a result of a hack attack, lost or stolen computers, fraud, insider theft, and more. Privacy Rights Clearinghouse explains how to follow the breaches, why consumers should be concerned and what to do if a data breach happens to you.

How to Choose an Identity Theft Monitoring Service


If you’re thinking about purchasing identity theft monitoring services, there is now a “shopping guide” that will help you choose the best service for you. The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) participated in a task force hosted by the Consumer Federation of America to develop a set of guidelines for the identity theft monitoring industry. Members of the task force, which included industry, consumer, and government representatives, researched the industry for 16 months and recently published Best Practices for Identity Theft Services (PDF). The report provides a blueprint for what identity theft monitoring services should be doing.

CFA Issues Best Practices for Identity Theft Services


On Thursday, March 10, 2011 the Consumer Federation of America (CFA) released Best Practices for Identity Theft Services (PDF) to address consumer concern about misleading marketing and exaggerated protection guarantees. Identity theft services typically monitor individuals’ credit reports for any activity, including inquiries and new accounts, and monitor public records for postings such as liens and judgments. Anomalies could be a sign that the individual is a victim of identity theft. The best practices are the result of 16 months of research and discussion by a multi-stakeholder task force that included Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) along with other consumer advocates and representatives of industry and government.

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