New Look for Prescreened Credit and Insurance Offers


tarting August 1, 2005, unsolicited offers for credit or insurance that are based on information in your credit report should be easier to spot.

New regulations adopted by the Federal Trade Commission now require notices to prominently display the toll free number (1-888-5OPTOUT or 1-888-567-8688) to opt-out. Now, this number, along with a statement that you can stop the unsolicited offers, must appear - in at least 12-point type - on the first page of the offer.

Request Disclosure of Information Sharing Under California's Shine the Light Act


On January 1, 2005, California's Shine the Light Act came into effect. For more information about the Act, see the PRC's press release at www.privacyrights.org/ar/SB27Release.htm. In essence, certain businesses must provide California residents with a way to find out what personal information has been shared and with whom within the twelve months prior to receiving your request for disclosure.

California's "Shine the Light" Law Goes into Effect Jan. 1, 2005


When you’ve received junk mail, have you ever wondered which company provided your name and address to the marketer? Now you can find out. The “Shine the Light” law requires certain businesses to disclose their information-sharing practices with their customers. Upon request, companies must tell you with whom they have shared your personal information for marketing purposes within the last twelve months.

Consumer Notice Requirements for Opting Out of Pre-Approved Offers of Credit


For years, consumers have received preapproved credit offers with required notices and opt-out telephone numbers buried in fine print along with other mandatory legal notices. We support the Commission’s proposal to provide a layered notice. The proposal calls for a “short notice” on the principal promotional document. The short notice includes the most important information, including opt-out telephone number, with direction to a “long notice” located elsewhere in the solicitation.

New Privacy Rights May Be Buried in "Junk" Mail


Now is not the time to toss junk mail and ignore inserts in your bank and credit card statements. "Watch your mail!" says Tena Friery, research director of the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.

Because of a new federal law, financial institutions are now mailing notices to consumers containing important information about their privacy rights. "Failure to pay attention to these privacy notices may result in sensitive financial data being sold to other companies for marketing and other purposes," warns Friery.

Calling All Direct Marketers to Heed the "Fair Information Practices"


In our nearly five years of experience in operating the hotline for California consumers, no other topic has garnered the response that unwanted mail does -- not even media reports on medical records or workplace privacy, where the consequences of privacy abuse are likely to be far more serious. In 1994, unwanted mail was the number one topic of complaint on the hotline, accounting for nearly one-third of calls.

What's going on here?

Our analysis of the "junk mail phenomenom" focuses on control. Every day, consumers are reminded that they have virtually no control over what enters their mail box.

Nonprofit Organizations and Privacy: Responsible Mailing List Management


We got a call from a woman who had written over 2,000 letters in the past couple years, asking to be taken off various and sundry mailing lists. She kept detailed records of all her correspondence and its effect. The one entity that was the most troublesome to her was a nonprofit organization -- she wrote it 18 times to no avail. It was the Republican National Committee

The Privacy Benefits of Living Full-Time in an RV


Date Posted: 
January 16, 2014

Once you live in an RV (and have sold your home), you will no longer be listed on a property tax web site, for all junk mailers to see and to come after you!  Further, you will no longer need accounts with utility companies, as RV parks provide the utilities.  And, even better, since the RV is your primary residence, the interest (if you financed it) is currently (as of this writing) deductible as mortgage interest on a primary home!

If you want to go “underground” and avoid junk mailers, living in a recreational vehicle (RV) can help you achieve almost invisible status. To do this, you need to sell your house, give your furniture and other furnishings to charity (and possibly take a tax writeoff on Schedule A of the income tax form!), put any treasured belongings that you can’t bear to part with (but have no room in your RV), into storage, and take off!

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