Chronology of Data Breaches: FAQ


Chronology of Data Breaches: FAQ

"Other" Consumer Reports: What You Should Know about "Specialty" Reports


Fact Sheet 6b"Other" Consumer Reports:
What You Should Know about "Specialty" Reports

Despite its name, the Fair Credit Reporting Act covers a lot more than simply credit reports. Credit reports are just one of a broader category of consumer reports covered by the FCRA. Consumer reports can also include reports about you made to employers, insurance companies, banks, and landlords. In recent years, many new companies have sprouted, compiling reports specifically targeted at employers, insurers, and landlords. The companies that compile reports for targeted users are “consumer reporting agencies” under the FCRA, just like the three national credit bureaus: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax.

Companies that compile reports on consumers for other than credit have been designated by Congress as “nationwide specialty consumer reporting agencies.” These agencies compile reports about much more than just your credit history. Here are a few examples of the types of reports that they compile:

  • Medical conditions (for example, the Medical Information Bureau (MIB) report)
  • Residential or tenant history and evictions (for example, the Unlawful Detainer (UD) Registry)
  • Check writing history (for example ChexSystems)
  • Employment background checks
  • Homeowner and auto insurance claims (for example, CLUE reports)

From Cradle to Grave: Government Records and Your Privacy


Fact Sheet 11From Cradle to Grave:
Government Records and Your Privacy

Data Brokers and Your Privacy


Fact Sheet 41Data Brokers and Your Privacy

1. Introduction

Technological advances allow us to do many useful things and to simplify our daily tasks.  The flip-side of these advances in technology is the unprecedented ability to collect, store, manipulate, and disseminate virtually unlimited amounts of data about people.  Numerous companies known as data brokers have entered this business and make money by selling information that they are able to compile.  These companies assemble “digital dossiers” about individuals that may include a surprisingly broad range of information.  Most people have no idea of the extent of this data collection.  It can be challenging, if not impossible, for consumers to escape this collection of personal data.

Data Brokers: Buying and Selling Your Personal Information


Perhaps you just purchased a new home.  Maybe you’re getting married or expecting a baby.  You bought a new car.  You subscribed to a magazine.  Or maybe you just ordered a pizza.  What do all of these activities have in common?  There’s a good chance that your personal information may have fallen into the hands of a data broker. 

While data brokers often remain invisible to consumers, they have the potential to significantly impact our lives.  It can be challenging, if not impossible, for consumers to escape the collection of personal data by data brokers. 

Privacy Rights Clearinghouse’s new guide Data Brokers and Your Privacy discusses the data broker industry and the “digital dossiers” that they assemble about individuals.  These dossiers often include a surprisingly broad range of information.

Oct. 11 Privacy Event: The Digital Collection of Personal Information from Consumers and Citizens


In Washington D.C. on Tuesday, October 11, privacy and civil liberties experts will convene to discuss how the digital collection of personal information harms consumers and citizens. Every day, companies amass information about consumers via online tracking, digital devices, and public records. These practices are largely unregulated, but have serious consequences for consumers and society.

The panel will be from 8:45 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. Eastern. Watch LIVE online at http://www.visualwebcaster.com/ProtectingConsumerPrivacyOnline.

The event is sponsored by the ACLU, Center for Digital Democracy, Consumer Action, Consumer Federation of America, Consumers Union, Consumer Watchdog, Electronic Privacy Information Center, Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, US PIRG and World Privacy Forum.

PRC Responds to FTC's Proposed Privacy Framework


On Feb. 18, Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) submitted comments to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) on its preliminary report, “Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: a Proposed Framework for Businesses and Policymakers.”  PRC commended FTC for recognizing the growing need for stronger consumer privacy protection both offline and online. However, PRC believes that self-regulation is ultimately not enough and that truly effective privacy protection is best accomplished through federal legislation. PRC’s comments focused on two major privacy issues: online behavioral advertising and data brokers.

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