We're in the Transparency Business: Electronic Frontier Foundation Pioneer Award Acceptance Remarks

I thank you - the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the judges. It is truly an honor to receive a Pioneer Award and to join the other Pioneers whom I've admired and revered for years. (www.eff.org/awards/pioneer.html )

I want to say a few words of thanks - and then briefly describe our work in terms of the larger issue of "transparency." But first - my thanks.

Keeping our doors open these past 10 years has been a roller coaster experience. And I'm sure many of you who work in consumer nonprofits can relate. We have been fortunate to obtain funding support from a variety of sources.

Electronic Frontier Foundation Honors Pioneer Award Winners: San Francisco Ceremony for Gillmor, Givens, DeCSS Writers

The online civil liberties group chose to honor Dan Gillmor for his commitment to accurate and cutting edge reporting on cybertech issues; Beth Givens for her dedicated work in fighting for consumers' privacy rights and in raising public awareness on privacy issues; and the DeCSS Writers, to be accepted by Jon Johansen, for their pioneering work on the pivotal program that enabled the development of a DVD player that runs on the Linux operating system.

New Privacy Study Challenges Industry Assertions on the Cost of Protecting Consumers' Privacy (Gellman)

Robert Gellman has released a paper on the costs of NOT protecting privacy. The March 26, 2002, white paper is titled "Privacy, Consumers, and Costs: How The Lack of Privacy Costs Consumers and Why Business Studies of Privacy Costs Are Biased and Incomplete."

Privacy is an elusive, value-laden concept, and it is hard to reach consensus on a definition. In recent, self-serving studies, the business community seized upon this lack of clarity to distort debates about the true costs of privacy - costs to individuals, society and to the business community itself. These studies have led to a mainly one-sided public discussion of privacy, overstating the costs to businesses, ignoring the costs consumers incur to protect their privacy, and understating the benefits that privacy offers to commerce and to society.

California Consumers: On Hold for New Telemarketing "Do Not Call" List

Few things annoy consumers more than intrusive telemarketing calls ­- which always come at the wrong time. Thanks to a new law, consumers can sign up to be on a statewide "do not call" list.

Many Californians have read about the new law and are anxious to be on the list. However, the sign-up does not start until January of 2003. Then, for just $1.00, consumers can be included on the list for three years.

The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse and UCAN Launch the Pre-Recorded Telemarketing Calls Project

  • The phone rings. You rush to the phone, expecting a call from a friend. But instead, you're greeted with a canned message offering you a timeshare or a special deal on cell phone service.
  • You arrive home after a long day at work and retrieve your voice mail messages, only to hear a long-winded prerecorded spiel pitching you a deal on home siding.

What's wrong with this picture? Did you know that pre-recorded messages are a violation of federal law? And if the telemarketer is a company in California, did you know that all such calls must be introduced with a "live" person asking you if you want to listen to a recorded message?

San Mateo Co. (California) Board of Supervisors Unanimously Adopts Financial Information Privacy Ordinance

Redwood City - The Board of Supervisors unanimously adopted an ordinance today to protect consumers' financial information privacy. With this ordinance, San Mateo County has become the first jurisdiction in California to provide consumers privacy protections in excess of those found in federal law, Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. This ordinance would require financial institutions to ask for and receive consumerís permission before disclosing consumerís confidential information to third parties.

A Cautionary Tale about Debit Cards and Fraud: A Former Debit Card User Tells Her Story

My first experience with "Debit Card Fraud" happened in August 1997. I get paid once a month, so I pay all my bills by the 5th of each month. This month, I had done that and paid out approximately $1,400, leaving me with about $400 for the rest of the month. Well, on August 6, 1997, I received approximately nine envelopes from Southwest Airlines, all addressed to me at my current address (I thought this was very weird because I had not had any type of contact or business with Southwest). I opened each envelope and found an itinerary for several individuals (unknown to me). These itineraries indicated these individuals "flew" all over the country (between 7-30-97 and 8-3-97) and I was billed for it. The total airlines tickets were $1,775; and, of course since my paycheck had just been deposited into my account, these itineraries were "paid."

Comments to California Department of Insurance Concerning Privacy of Personal Financial and Medical Record Information

We are pleased to see that the proposed regulations, as revised, include a number of changes that will benefit individual privacy interests. We commend the staff of the Department for efforts to balance multiple interests and their willingness to consider our concerns about loss of personal privacy.

Pages

Showing 10-18 of 19 results
Subscribe to 2002