Valentine e-Cards May Deliver More Than Just Love!

With Valentine's Day upon us, you may be receiving so-called "e-cards" in your email inbox. Some may come from anonymous senders or secret admirers. They might appeal to your curiosity and cause you to click on a link, claiming that the e-card is from a family member, friend, or other unnamed person.

Comments to Department of Health and Human Services re Breach Notification for Unsecured Protected Health Information

The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) appreciates this opportunity to comment on the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS or Department) interim final rules regarding breach notification to individuals in the event of unauthorized use and access of protected health information. The rules, issued in coordination with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), are mandated by Section 13402 of the Health Information Technology for Clinical Health (HITECH) A

Welcome to Our New Website!

Privacy Rights Clearinghouse is pleased to welcome you to our re-designed website.  Our new site incorporates user-oriented features that make it easier for visitors to quickly find and share information.  We’ve also updated our widely popular privacy compilations, including our Online Information Brokers List and our nationally-recognized Chronology of Data Breaches

Using the open source software Drupal, our new site allows PRC's privacy advocates to update the site more frequently - without compromising the privacy of our visitors.

Holiday Shopping? Ten Timely Tips

During the holiday season, you may be shopping more frequently and under more crowded and frantic conditions.   Follow these tips to help avoid scams and rip-offs.   Be a privacy-smart consumer!  Wherever you happen to shop this holiday season--the mall, online, or on Main Street--following these tips will help you have a safer and more private holiday season.

The Proliferation of Online Information Brokers: Noncompliance with Their Own Privacy Policies and Other Problems

There are dozens of information brokers in the marketplace today that make information about individuals widely available, often with no questions asked, some of them at no charge and others for a fee.

Want to Buy a $37 Soda?

Pay with a debit card and that refreshing soda on a hot day may give your wallet chills. Because of the way that most banks process debit card transactions, a $2.00 soda can generate $35 in bank fees. In this alert, we’ll highlight basic steps consumers should take to avoid the pernicious cycle of overdrafts and bank fees

Comments to the Los Angeles City Council: Public Policy Ramifications of Cloud Computing

I am writing to express concern about the proposal for the City of LA to implement Google Apps for its e-mail and office systems.

I am concerned about the propriety of a government entity using services that are “in the cloud,” so to speak, as repositories for sensitive personal and organizational information.

I question if enough is yet known about the privacy, security and confidentiality of personal information in a cloud environment.

10 Rules for Creating a Hacker-Resistant Password

Password-protected web sites are becoming more vulnerable because often people use the same passwords on numerous sites.  One study by Sophos, a security firm, found that more than 30% of users recycle the same password for every site that they access. A strong password can help individuals protect themselves against hackers, identity theft and other privacy invasions.

Want to develop tough-to-crack passwords that resist infiltration? Follow these 10 rules.

“Pay As You Drive” Automobile Insurance: Comments on the Need to Guard Personal Privacy

On June 18, 2008, PRC and Privacy Activism responded to a call for comments when DOI first considered adopting a pay-drive program.

Our June 2008 comments discuss the serious threats to privacy inherent in a pay-drive program that depends on data gathered by onboard technology. Our concerns extended not only to the kinds of data collected by installed devices but also to the potential and unforeseen secondary uses of collected data. With few exceptions, our concerns about the threats to privacy and potential secondary uses of data remain essentially unchanged from those expressed in June 2008.

“Pay As You Drive” Automobile Insurance: The Need to Guard Personal Privacy

Privacy Rights Clearinghouse and PrivacyActivism agree that a pay-drive plan that offers financial incentives for those who drive infrequently or who may choose to carpool or take public transportation has enormous potential for reducing traffic and protecting the environment. However, we respectfully disagree with the Commissioner’s statements in his August 3, 2009, press release that the regulations protect the privacy of California drivers.

Also, regrettably, neither the Department’s press release nor the amended regulations explain how the privacy of California drivers is protected.

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