Protecting Your Telephone Records: Does Your Carrier’s Privacy Policy Ring True?


Fact Sheet 34Protecting Your Telephone Records:
Does Your Carrier’s Privacy Policy Ring True?

We have more than 50 Privacy Fact Sheets. Click here to see the rest.

When you pick up your telephone and punch in a number, you expect that the contact is just between you and the person you call. Sure, you know your telephone carrier logs your phone’s activity. After all, a record of your mobile phone calls appears on your monthly telephone bill. And the bill for your landline phone includes information on calls made to phone numbers outside the local zone. But, what you don’t expect is that someone could use your calling history to pry into your personal life, even to physically harm you.

Since 1996, federal communications laws have required telephone companies to protect the confidentiality of your telephone calls. Despite this restriction, in the years after 1996 instances of unauthorized access to telephone records exploded. This guide explains the current efforts to stop unauthorized access to your telephone records. It offers suggestions on how to protect your records, and it provides resources for additional reading.

Social Networking Privacy: How to be Safe, Secure and Social


Fact Sheet 35Social Networking Privacy:
How to be Safe, Secure and Social

What do your long lost childhood best friend, your college roommate, your boss and your significant other all have in common? If you are one of the hundreds of millions of people using social networks, there’s a good chance that you are linked to them through an online relationship. The information you share with your online contacts allows you to keep in touch without much effort, but who else is looking at that information? And how are they going to use it?

Many people besides friends and acquaintances are interested in the information people post on social networks.  Identity thieves, scam artists, debt collectors, stalkers and corporations looking for a market advantage are using social networks to gather information about consumers.  Companies that operate social networks are themselves collecting a variety of data about their users, both to personalize the services for the users and to sell to advertisers.  

This fact sheet will provide information about the advantages and disadvantages of using social networks, what kind of information may be safe to post and how to protect it, as well as who is able to access different types of information posted to these networks.

Securing Your Computer to Maintain Your Privacy


Fact Sheet 36Securing Your Computer to Maintain Your Privacy

The Perils and Pitfalls of Online Dating: How to Protect Yourself


Fact Sheet 37The Perils and Pitfalls of Online Dating:
How to Protect Yourself

A Renter’s Guide to Privacy: What to Know Before You Sign the Lease, While You Rent, and When You Move Out


Fact Sheet 38 A Renter’s Guide to Privacy:
What to Know Before You Sign the Lease, While You Rent, and When You Move Out

Mobile Health and Fitness Apps: What Are the Privacy Risks?


Fact Sheet 39Mobile Health and Fitness Apps:
What Are the Privacy Risks?

Bring Your Own Device . . . at Your Own Risk


Fact Sheet 40Bring Your Own Device . . . at Your Own Risk

1.  What is BYOD?

In the not too distant past, employees had no choice but to work at a company's office or on a company laptop or phone.  As mobile electronic devices (tablets and smartphones, for example) became both more accessible and affordable, this changed.  Now employees can work virtually anywhere and it's becoming more and more common for them to use devices for both personal and work purposes. 

Many individuals own multiple mobile devices.  One person may own a smartphone, tablet, and laptop computer.  An employer may also offer employees one or more company-owned devices. For some, it's both inconvenient and less productive to carry company-issued and personal devices.  Others may prefer a specific technology or brand, or simply be annoyed by having to carry multiple devices.

Data Brokers and Your Privacy


Fact Sheet 41Data Brokers and Your Privacy

1. Introduction

Technological advances allow us to do many useful things and to simplify our daily tasks.  The flip-side of these advances in technology is the unprecedented ability to collect, store, manipulate, and disseminate virtually unlimited amounts of data about people.  Numerous companies known as data brokers have entered this business and make money by selling information that they are able to compile.  These companies assemble “digital dossiers” about individuals that may include a surprisingly broad range of information.  Most people have no idea of the extent of this data collection.  It can be challenging, if not impossible, for consumers to escape this collection of personal data.

Showing 71-78 of 78 results
Syndicate content


X

Sign In!

Loading