Oversight Hearing On Financial Privacy and the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Financial Services Modernization Act

ongress knew that the 1999 Gramm-Leach Bliley Financial Services Modernization Act (GLBA) - a law long-sought by the financial industry to encourage the creation of integrated financial services firms -- would exacerbate already-identified financial privacy threats. So  Congress incorporated Title V to protect financial privacy, which included the following five key provisions. The most important and most successful is the last: the fail-safe states' rights provision allowing states to enact stronger financial privacy laws.

Comments to California Department of Insurance Concerning Privacy of Personal Financial and Medical Record Information

We are pleased to see that the proposed regulations, as revised, include a number of changes that will benefit individual privacy interests. We commend the staff of the Department for efforts to balance multiple interests and their willingness to consider our concerns about loss of personal privacy.

Ten Privacy Principals for Health Care

Health-related information that we share with doctors and others is among the most intimate and sensitive of all personal information. In addition to information about physical health, these records may include information about family relationships, sexual behavior, substance abuse, and private thoughts and feelings related to mental health.

Yet, as privacy advocate Evan Hendricks put it, video rental records in this country are afforded more privacy protection under law than are medical records.

Privacy Principles for California

California has many privacy-related laws on the books. These address government agency information use, telephone records and wiretapping, credit reporting, telemarketing, medical records, employment records, cable television viewing patterns, video rental records, merchant information gathering, insurance record-keeping, and identity theft. In many instances, California has led the nation in the creation of such laws.

Merging County Social Services Data Bases: Privacy Pitfalls and a Policy Solution

My presentation will focus on the privacy implications of the integration of health and human services. I am going to spend most of my time describing a set of privacy principles which I believe are essential to guide the merger and use of information from several agencies and department. These are called the Fair Information Principles.

Privacy Implications of Privatization of the County's Information Technology Systems

A great deal has been said and written about the management of technology under a privatized system. But little about the information itself.

The County holds a tremendous amount of personal information about its citizens. Property tax records, voting files, library records, the extensive data files of our social services including health and welfare data, birth, death, and marriage certificates, court documents, and so on.

JetBlue: Complaint for Violations of CA Business and Professions Code Sections 17200, et seq.

JetBlue Airways Corporation ("JetBlue"), through an agreement with Torch Concepts, acting in its capacity as a subcontractor for SRS Technologies, provided the personal information of over a million passengers, some of whom are located in California, without such passengers' authorization or consent and in violation of JetBlue's stated privacy policy not to share without consent any passenger data with any third parties.

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