The Emperor's New Clothes: Privacy on the Internet in 1999


The most irrefutable finding of the May 1999 Internet Privacy Policy Survey (hereinafter called the Survey) is that collection of personally identifiable information is the norm on commercial web sites. The Survey found that 93% of the sites in the sample (n=364) collect at least one type of personal information (such as name, email address, postal address). Only 7% of the sites collect no information.(2)

Merging County Social Services Data Bases: Privacy Pitfalls and a Policy Solution


My presentation will focus on the privacy implications of the integration of health and human services. I am going to spend most of my time describing a set of privacy principles which I believe are essential to guide the merger and use of information from several agencies and department. These are called the Fair Information Principles.

Privacy Implications of Privatization of the County's Information Technology Systems


A great deal has been said and written about the management of technology under a privatized system. But little about the information itself.

The County holds a tremendous amount of personal information about its citizens. Property tax records, voting files, library records, the extensive data files of our social services including health and welfare data, birth, death, and marriage certificates, court documents, and so on.

Ten Privacy Principals for Health Care


Health-related information that we share with doctors and others is among the most intimate and sensitive of all personal information. In addition to information about physical health, these records may include information about family relationships, sexual behavior, substance abuse, and private thoughts and feelings related to mental health.

Yet, as privacy advocate Evan Hendricks put it, video rental records in this country are afforded more privacy protection under law than are medical records.

Consumers' Concerns about Financial Privacy and Security


I have been asked by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) to present an overview of consumers' concerns about financial privacy and security. I think the best way for me to do that is to tell you about some of the cases that have come to my attention from people calling our hotline or sending e-mail messages.

True or False? You Can Find Out Anything About Anybody on the Net


Privacy on the Internet is exploding as a topic of public concern these days. Recent surveys have found that 4 out 5 Net users are concerned about threats to their privacy when they're online. Yet only 6% of them have actually experienced privacy abuses.

Those who are not yet on the Net cite privacy as the main reason they have chosen not to become Internet users. If electronic commerce is going to thrive, this fear is going to have to be dealt with by laws and by industry practices. The Clinton Administration is counting on industry to regulate itself, something I will touch on later.

Privacy Principles for California


California has many privacy-related laws on the books. These address government agency information use, telephone records and wiretapping, credit reporting, telemarketing, medical records, employment records, cable television viewing patterns, video rental records, merchant information gathering, insurance record-keeping, and identity theft. In many instances, California has led the nation in the creation of such laws.

A Review of the Fair Information Principles: The Foundation of Privacy Public Policy


Nearly 25 years ago in 1973, a task force was formed at the U.S. Dept of Health Education and Welfare (HEW) to look at the impact of computerization on medical records privacy. The members wanted to develop policies that would allow the benefits of computerization to go forward, but at the same time provide safeguards for personal privacy.

Issues of Privacy and Access


Advances in technology give rise to the classic double edged sword. There are obvious benefits, such as locating and garnishing the wages of deadbeat parents. But there is also the downside, the development of a cradle to grave electronic dossier which can pose threats to personal privacy and which can be used for purposes of social control.

My presentation will focus on the privacy implications of advances in technology and the importance of crafting policies to enable the benefits to proceed while minimizing the negative consequences.

FTC Consumer Privacy Workshops: Data Base Study



In September 1996, there was a flurry of controversy surrounding the sale of personal information by the Lexis-Nexis company vis-a-vis its P-TRAK service. Although much of the brouhaha centered on the sale of Social Security numbers, which Lexis-Nexis had curtailed a few months earlier, the public outcry illustrated a growing concern about electronic privacy. The Lexis-Nexis phone lines were jammed with people requesting that their records be deleted from the P-TRAK data base.

What most of these people did not realize is that Lexis-Nexis is not the only seller of personally identifiable information.

Showing 111-120 of 131 results
Syndicate content


X

Sign In!

Loading