PRC Comments on Proposed HHS - Medical Records Privacy Rule


Even though the proposed rule lays the foundation for the implementation of fair information principles, it takes several steps backward and gravely endangers patient privacy in a number of areas, explained below. Because of the significant shortcomings of the proposed rule, in addition to the relatively limited opportunity for individuals to have been apprised of and comment on the rule, the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse recommends that the proposed rule be withdrawn and redrafted.

Privacy Expectations in a High Tech World


Now, we're experiencing the explosion of commerce on the Internet. Web sites are able to capture data from their visitors, and to merge that data with other information. With the exception of the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act and a smattering of state laws regulating spam, or unsolicited electronic mail, there is little regulation of data collection on the Net.

So, what are consumers' experiences on the Net concerning their privacy? I will list several themes that I've observed in talking to consumers and in following news stories about online privacy abuses in recent months.

Privacy Rights of Employees Using Workplace Computers In California


Employers and employees are concerned about computers in the workplace.  Employers worry that employees waste time, such as by chatting or shopping on-line. [1]   Employers worry too that employees create liability by viewing and circulating pornographic, racist, or other improper material.

 Employees worry about their privacy.  Software, like Specter, SurfWatch, Eblaster, Telemate, Message Inspector, Silent Watch, Websense, Little Brother, and WinWhatWhere, allows the computer owner to monitor computer use. [2]   Some software allows the owner to check users' e-mail and Web destinations; some also allows viewing of entire e-mail messages, Web images, and word processing documents.  Moreover, most of this software can be installed without alerting the computer user. [3]

 The press has reported that employees have no privacy rights whatsoever when using their employers' computers and that employers can spy at will. [4]

The Emperor's New Clothes: Privacy on the Internet in 1999


The most irrefutable finding of the May 1999 Internet Privacy Policy Survey (hereinafter called the Survey) is that collection of personally identifiable information is the norm on commercial web sites. The Survey found that 93% of the sites in the sample (n=364) collect at least one type of personal information (such as name, email address, postal address). Only 7% of the sites collect no information.(2)

Merging County Social Services Data Bases: Privacy Pitfalls and a Policy Solution


My presentation will focus on the privacy implications of the integration of health and human services. I am going to spend most of my time describing a set of privacy principles which I believe are essential to guide the merger and use of information from several agencies and department. These are called the Fair Information Principles.

Privacy Implications of Privatization of the County's Information Technology Systems


A great deal has been said and written about the management of technology under a privatized system. But little about the information itself.

The County holds a tremendous amount of personal information about its citizens. Property tax records, voting files, library records, the extensive data files of our social services including health and welfare data, birth, death, and marriage certificates, court documents, and so on.

Ten Privacy Principals for Health Care


Health-related information that we share with doctors and others is among the most intimate and sensitive of all personal information. In addition to information about physical health, these records may include information about family relationships, sexual behavior, substance abuse, and private thoughts and feelings related to mental health.

Yet, as privacy advocate Evan Hendricks put it, video rental records in this country are afforded more privacy protection under law than are medical records.

Consumers' Concerns about Financial Privacy and Security


I have been asked by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) to present an overview of consumers' concerns about financial privacy and security. I think the best way for me to do that is to tell you about some of the cases that have come to my attention from people calling our hotline or sending e-mail messages.

True or False? You Can Find Out Anything About Anybody on the Net


Privacy on the Internet is exploding as a topic of public concern these days. Recent surveys have found that 4 out 5 Net users are concerned about threats to their privacy when they're online. Yet only 6% of them have actually experienced privacy abuses.

Those who are not yet on the Net cite privacy as the main reason they have chosen not to become Internet users. If electronic commerce is going to thrive, this fear is going to have to be dealt with by laws and by industry practices. The Clinton Administration is counting on industry to regulate itself, something I will touch on later.

Privacy Principles for California


California has many privacy-related laws on the books. These address government agency information use, telephone records and wiretapping, credit reporting, telemarketing, medical records, employment records, cable television viewing patterns, video rental records, merchant information gathering, insurance record-keeping, and identity theft. In many instances, California has led the nation in the creation of such laws.

Showing 111-120 of 134 results
Syndicate content


X

Sign In!

Loading