The Tradeoff between Privacy and Openness in Employment Screening

We have heard from several individuals who have described their experiences with background checks that retrieve wrongful criminal records. Even after they have informed the employer that the background report is in error, they've learned that it's too late. The employer has moved on to another applicant, or perhaps is so risk-averse that the employer does not want the hassle of dealing with someone with a tarnished record, even though it's erroneous.

PRC Rebutts Newspaper Editorial Lauding Full Disclosure of Personal Information of Campaign Contributors on www.fundrace.org

Your March 30th editorial on the website www.FundRace.org has it wrong. You tell people "there's no reason to fear" the fact that their name, home address, occupation, and campaign contribution information is on the Internet for all the world to see. But many individuals have very legitimate reasons to not want their home address posted on the Internet.

Consumer Notice Requirements for Opting Out of Pre-Approved Offers of Credit

For years, consumers have received preapproved credit offers with required notices and opt-out telephone numbers buried in fine print along with other mandatory legal notices. We support the Commission’s proposal to provide a layered notice. The proposal calls for a “short notice” on the principal promotional document. The short notice includes the most important information, including opt-out telephone number, with direction to a “long notice” located elsewhere in the solicitation.

Comments Regarding Federal Trade Commission Proposal to Continue to Conduct Surveys of the Public on Identity Theft

The Commission's 2003 survey found approximately 10 million identify theft victims in the prior year. Before the 2003 survey was released, annual victims were estimated at between half to three quarters of a million per year. These earlier estimates, everyone with any knowledge agree, grossly underestimated the scale and impact of this crime. The 2003 survey sounded a wake-up call. Still, we are not convinced that a complete picture of identity theft is known.

Comments on FACTA Disposal Rule: Disposal of Consumer Report Information and Records

The Disposal Rule, as proposed, covers a wide array of entities that compile and use consumer data. Once finalized, the Rule will impose records disposal requirements on entities that before had no reason to consider the consequences of irresponsible information handling practices.

Criminal Identity Theft in California: Seeking Solutions to the "Worst Case Scenario"

Criminal identity theft occurs when an imposter gives another person’s name and personal information, such as a Social Security number, driver’s license number, and date of birth, to a law enforcement officer upon arrest or during an investigation. Or the imposter may give to law enforcement a counterfeit driver’s license or identification card containing another person’s information.  Read Beth Given's presentation at the Identity Theft Summit in 2005.

Regarding the Privacy Implications of the Proposed National Health Information Network (NHIN)

The proposed National Health Information Network embodies a presidential mandate to bring information technology to healthcare by making complete patient records available to providers, regardless of location.

In responding to the questions asked in the RFI, we will discuss matters of privacy and security, and also whether standardization of healthcare information may ultimately be detrimental to patient treatment.

Groups Warn of Privacy Risks in Employment Screening

Terrorist threats, workplace violence, and reported abuse of vulnerable segments of the population have contributed to a dramatic increase in criminal records checks. Advances in technology have also made criminal history checks faster, less expensive, and easy to obtain from a variety of sources.

Existing problems in the employment screening process - particularly with accuracy - can lead to chronic unemployment or dismissal from a longstanding job. The job applicant or employee has virtually no rights to have an adverse decision reconsidered, even when decisions are based on inaccurate information. Any standards for access by private employers and commercial data vendors must go beyond the current requirements of the FCRA.

Keeping Customer Proprietary Network Information (CPNI) Private: Comments to the FCC

Consumers expect that their telephone calling records will remain private and unavailable to third parties without the customer's knowledge and authorization. Yet, it is clear that this expectation is unrealistic, evidenced by the findings in the Petition for Rulemaking submitted to the Commission by the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC).3

EPIC's Petition as well as recent news reports, state and federal legislative proposals, and government lawsuits against data brokers all point to a disturbing situation: Not only are current safeguards for customer calling records inadequate, but those that exist are being blatantly ignored.

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