Social Networking Privacy: How to be Safe, Secure and Social


Fact Sheet 35Social Networking Privacy:
How to be Safe, Secure and Social

What do your long lost childhood best friend, your college roommate, your boss and your significant other all have in common? If you are one of the hundreds of millions of people using social networks, there’s a good chance that you are linked to them through an online relationship. The information you share with your online contacts allows you to keep in touch without much effort, but who else is looking at that information? And how are they going to use it?

Many people besides friends and acquaintances are interested in the information people post on social networks.  Identity thieves, scam artists, debt collectors, stalkers and corporations looking for a market advantage are using social networks to gather information about consumers.  Companies that operate social networks are themselves collecting a variety of data about their users, both to personalize the services for the users and to sell to advertisers.  

This fact sheet will provide information about the advantages and disadvantages of using social networks, what kind of information may be safe to post and how to protect it, as well as who is able to access different types of information posted to these networks.

10 Rules for Creating a Hacker-Resistant Password


Password-protected web sites are becoming more vulnerable because often people use the same passwords on numerous sites.  One study by Sophos, a security firm, found that more than 30% of users recycle the same password for every site that they access. A strong password can help individuals protect themselves against hackers, identity theft and other privacy invasions.

Want to develop tough-to-crack passwords that resist infiltration? Follow these 10 rules.

How to Secure Windows and Your Privacy with Free Software (Fosdick) (.pdf file)


Did you know that Windows secretly records all the web sites you've ever visited? And after you delete your Outlook emails and empty the Waste Basket, someone could still read your email?
And that Microsoft Word and Excel documents contain secret keys that uniquely identify you?

This guide explains these – and many other -- threats to your security and privacy when you use Windows computers. It describes these concerns in simple, non-technical terms. The goal is to provide information anyone can understand.


This guide also offers solutions: safe practices you can follow, and free programs you can install. Download links appear for the free programs as they are cited.

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