Prepaid Cards and Your Privacy

Prepaid cards, also known as “general purpose reloadable cards”, have become increasingly popular in the past few years, among both consumers with and without a bank account. According to a recent report by The Pew Charitable Trusts, approximately 1 in 11 consumers use a prepaid card at least once per month, and 27% of these users do not have a checking account.

Since prepaid cards look and function much like bank cards, many Americans may see them as a simple alternative with less obligation. However, prepaid cards can also come with a hefty list of ‘terms and conditions’ governing fees, penalties, and responsibilities the consumer may not even be aware of at the time of purchase.

 

Passwords and Your Privacy

Passwords are the first line of defense against the compromise of your digital information.  Revealing the data on your phone, your banking information, your email, your medical records, or other personal information could be devastating.  Yet many people fail to follow proper practices when selecting the passwords to protect this important information.  Here are some password “dos” and “don’ts” that can help you to maintain the security of your personal data.

Do use longer passwords.  Passwords become harder to crack with each character that you add, so longer passwords are better than shorter ones. A brute-force attack can easily defeat a short password.

Do use special characters, such as $, #, and &.  Most passwords are case sensitive, so use a mixture of upper case and lower case letters, as well as numbers.  An online password checker can help you determine the strength of your password.

So you have a privacy question or complaint—now what?

Submit your privacy questions and complaints to us through our Online Complaint Center (OCC). Privacy Rights Clearinghouse’s dedicated Consumer Advisor responds to everyone, and we work very hard to stay up-to-date on a wide range of privacy issues

Here are some common questions we receive about the OCC.